The inability of human immunodeficiency virus to infect chimpanzee monocytes can be overcome by serial viral passage in vivo

H. E. Gendelman, G. D. Ehrlich, L. M. Baca, S. Conley, J. Ribas, D. C. Kalter, M. S. Meltzer, B. J. Poiesz, P. Nara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies of lentivirus infection in ruminants, nonhuman primates, and humans suggest that virus infection of macrophages plays a central role in the disease process. To investigate whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect chimpanzee macrophages, we recovered monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-negative animals and inoculated these and control human monocytes with a panel of four human-passaged monocytotropic virus strains and one chimpanzee-passaged isolate. HIV-1-infected human monocytes synthesized proviral DNA, viral mRNA, p24 antigen, and progeny virions. In contrast, except for the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate, chimpanzee monocytes failed to support HIV-1 replication when cultured under both identical and a variety of other conditions. Proviral DNA was demonstrated only at background levels in these cell cultures by polymerase chain reaction for gag- and env-related sequences. Interestingly, the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate did not replicate in human monocytes; viral p24 antigens and progeny virions were not detected. The same monocytotropic panel of HIV-1 strains replicated in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphoblasts treated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The failure of HIV-1 to infect chimpanzee monocytes, which can be overcome by serial in vivo viral passage, occurs through a block early in the viral life cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3853-3863
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of virology
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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