The interactive effects of self-perceptions and job requirements on creative problem solving

Erika J. Robinson-Morral, Roni Reiter-Palmon, James C. Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over the years, researchers have focused on ways to facilitate creativity in the workplace by looking at individual factors and organizational factors that affect employee creativity (Woodman, Sawyer, & Griffin,). In many cases, the factors that affect creativity are examined independently. In other words, it is uncommon for researchers to look at the interaction among individual and organizational factors. In this study, it is argued that to get a true understanding of how to maximize creativity in the workplace, organizational researchers must look at the interaction between organizational factors and individual factors that affect employee creativity. More specifically, the current study looked at an individual's perceptions about his or her ability to be creative (i.e., individual factor) and perceptions of requirements for creativity in the workplace (i.e., an organizational factor). The results indicated that individuals who have a high belief about their ability to be creative (an individual factor) were most creative when they also perceived requirements for creativity in the workplace (an organizational factor). Furthermore, individuals who had low perceptions of creative ability were still able to perform creatively when they had high perceptions of requirements for creativity. This suggests that, to maximize creativity, organizations should focus on both individual and organizational factors that affect employee creativity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-214
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Creative Behavior
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • creative problem solving
  • creativity
  • individual factors
  • interacting effects
  • organizational factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The interactive effects of self-perceptions and job requirements on creative problem solving'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this