The Long-Term Effects of Intrauterine Drug Exposure: Review of Recent Research and Implications for Early Childhood Special education

Mark D. Shriver, Wayne Piersel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reviews current research on the long-term outcomes of children exposed to drugs in utero. Areas reviewed include alcohol, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and multiple drug use. Literature on the outcomes of children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) was found to be the most extensive. There was a paucity of research on the long-term outcomes of children exposed to cocaine, marijuana, heroin, and multiple drugs. Methodological issues related to the analysis and interpretation of longitudinal studies are discussed. Differential intervention efforts based primarily on knowledge of a child's intrauterine exposure to drugs was unsupported by available evidence. It is recommended that early childhood special educators continue to utilize an ecological model to assess and intervene with the children exposed to drugs in utero who need special education services and with their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-183
Number of pages23
JournalTopics in Early Childhood Special education
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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