The Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycothiol S-transferase is divalent metal-dependent for mycothiol binding and transfer

Yahani P. Jayasinghe, Michael T. Banco, Jared J. Lindenberger, Lorenza Favrot, Zuzana Palčeková, Mary Jackson, Shino Manabe, Donald R. Ronning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mycothiol S-transferase (MST) (encoded by the rv0443 gene) was previously identified as the enzyme responsible for the transfer of Mycothiol (MSH) to xenobiotic acceptors in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) during xenobiotic stress. To further characterize the functionality of MST in vitro and the possible roles in vivo, X-ray crystallographic, metal-dependent enzyme kinetics, thermal denaturation studies, and antibiotic MIC determination in rv0433 knockout strain were performed. The binding of MSH and Zn2+ increases the melting temperature by 12.9 °C as a consequence of the cooperative stabilization of MST by both MSH and metal. The co-crystal structure of MST in complex with MSH and Zn2+ to 1.45 Å resolution supports the specific utilization of MSH as a substrate as well as affording insights into the structural requirements of MSH binding and the metal-assisted catalytic mechanism of MST. Contrary to the well-defined role of MSH in mycobacterial xenobiotic responses and the ability of MST to bind MSH, cell-based studies with an M.tb rv0443 knockout strain failed to provide evidence for a role of MST in processing of rifampicin or isoniazid. These studies suggest the necessity of a new direction to identify acceptors of the enzyme and better define the biological role of MST in mycobacteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-500
Number of pages10
JournalRSC Medicinal Chemistry
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 26 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

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