The poor get poorer and the rich get fiber: Why free/low-cost internet might not bridge the digital divide

Jordana George, Stacie C. Petter

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Public policy holds that bridging the digital divide is a critical requirement for improving the life chances of socio-economically disadvantaged groups. Free or subsidized internet access from government and non-profits is a common approach, however, with the advent of Google Fiber, a new venture providing free/low-cost fast internet, the access landscape is changing. We will study the effects of Google Fiber in Kansas City, Missouri, one of the first cities to receive the service. We propose several hypotheses on the relationship between free/low-cost, fast internet service and improved educational outcomes. We plan to compare academic performance results from Kansas City Public Schools inside and outside of Google Fiberhoods. We hope to determine if access to internet services such as Google Fiber have an impact on K-12 educational outcomes and what moderators may influence its effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 2016
Event22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave, AMCIS 2016 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 11 2016Aug 14 2016

Other

Other22nd Americas Conference on Information Systems: Surfing the IT Innovation Wave, AMCIS 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/11/168/14/16

Keywords

  • Digital divide
  • Education
  • Google Fiber
  • Internet access
  • Internet usage in the home
  • Social inclusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems

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