The root of dental anatomy: a case for naming Eustachius the "father of dental anatomy".

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Abstract

When one considers the names of those whose affect on dentistry reached far beyond their lifetimes, one may think of Fauchard, Wells, Morton and Black. One name that deserves to be called among the pantheon of the greats is Bartholomaeus Eustachius. Eustachius was not the first to study the anatomy of the teeth and jaws, having been preceded by Da Vinci; however, he was the first to publish a treatise devoted entirely to this subject, Libellus de Dentibus, in 1563. As Sir William Osler, the father of modern medicine, stated: "In Science, the credit goes to the man who convinces the world, not to whom the idea first occurs." The purpose of this paper is to show that Eustachius deserves to be named the father of dental anatomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-88
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the history of dentistry
Volume57
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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