The underreporting of phase III chemo-therapeutic clinical trial data of older patients with cancer: A systematic review

Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Beverly Canin, Ira Parker, Amy R. MacKenzie, Thuy Koll, Ritika Vankina, Christine D. Hsu, Brian Jang, Kathy Pan, Jennifer L. Lund, Edith Starbuck, Armin Shahrokni

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Inspired by the American Society of Clinical Oncology's recommendations to strengthen the evidence base for older adults with cancer, the purpose of this systematic review is to identify the reporting of treatment efficacy and adverse events specific to older adults with cancer in Phase III chemo-therapeutic clinical trials. This review also investigates the frequency with which these data points were reported in the literature to identify gaps in reporting and opportunities to expand the knowledge base on clinical outcomes for older adults with cancer. Methods: Chemo-therapeutic clinical trial data published from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017 was reviewed. Manuscripts (n = 929) were identified based on keyword searches of EMBASE and PubMed. After removal of duplicates (n = 116) and articles that did not meet this study's inclusion criteria (n = 654), 159 articles were identified for review. Results: Reviewed papers were published in 36 different scientific journals and included twenty-five different cancer types. Of the 159 articles, 117 (73.6%) reported age-specific medians and 75 (47.2%) included stratifications of data by age. Treatment efficacy was reported in 96.2% of the articles with 39.9% reporting effectiveness of treatment by age. Reporting of adverse events was included in 84.9% of the articles with only 8.9% reporting these events stratified by age. Conclusion: Results suggest inadequate reporting of treatment efficacy and adverse events as well as basic descriptive statistics about the age distribution of study subjects. Conscious efforts are needed to address these deficiencies at every level of planning and conducting clinical trials as wells as reporting outcomes stratified by age. Ultimately, standardized reporting could lead to improved treatment decisions and outcomes for older adults with cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-379
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Geriatric Oncology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Geriatric oncology
  • Older adults
  • Phase III clinical trials
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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