The Use of MRI-Derived Radiomic Models in Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification: A Critical Review of Contemporary Literature

Linda My Huynh, Yeagyeong Hwang, Olivia Taylor, Michael J. Baine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The development of precise medical imaging has facilitated the establishment of radiomics, a computer-based method of quantitatively analyzing subvisual imaging characteristics. The present review summarizes the current literature on the use of diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived radiomics in prostate cancer (PCa) risk stratification. A stepwise literature search of publications from 2017 to 2022 was performed. Of 218 articles on MRI-derived prostate radiomics, 33 (15.1%) generated models for PCa risk stratification. Prediction of Gleason score (GS), adverse pathology, postsurgical recurrence, and postradiation failure were the primary endpoints in 15 (45.5%), 11 (33.3%), 4 (12.1%), and 3 (9.1%) studies. In predicting GS and adverse pathology, radiomic models differentiated well, with receiver operator characteristic area under the curve (ROC-AUC) values of 0.50–0.92 and 0.60–0.92, respectively. For studies predicting post-treatment recurrence or failure, ROC-AUC for radiomic models ranged from 0.73 to 0.99 in postsurgical and radiation cohorts. Finally, of the 33 studies, 7 (21.2%) included external validation. Overall, most investigations showed good to excellent prediction of GS and adverse pathology with MRI-derived radiomic features. Direct prediction of treatment outcomes, however, is an ongoing investigation. As these studies mature and reach potential for clinical integration, concerted effort to validate these radiomic models must be undertaken.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1128
JournalDiagnostics
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2023

Keywords

  • prostate cancer
  • radiomics
  • risk stratification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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