Therapist- and self-monitored dro contingencies as a treatment for the self-injurious skin picking of a young man with asperger syndrome

Jeffrey H. Tiger, Wayne W. Fisher, Kelly J. Bouxsein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) has decreased, at least partially due to the development of less effortful alternative behavioral interventions (e.g., noncontingent reinforcement; Vollmer, Iwata, Zarcone, Smith, Sc Mazaleski, 1993 The effort associated with DRO contingencies may be lessened by incorporating self-monitoring components in which clients are responsible for the delivery of reinforcers for their own behavior. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of DRO in the treatment of self-injury when implemented first by the therapist and subsequently by the client.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-319
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Asperger syndrome
  • Differential reinforcement of other behavior
  • Selfmanagement
  • Skin picking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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