Thermal remote sensing of snow cover to identify the extent of hydrothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park

Cmu Neale, S. Sivarajan, A. Masih, C. Jaworowski, H. Heasler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

High resolution airborne multispectral and thermal infrared imagery (1-meter pixel resolution) was acquired over several hydrothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park both in September of 2011 and in early March, during the winter of 2012, when snow cover was still present in most of the Park. The multi-temporal imagery was used to identify the extent of the geothermal areas, as snow accumulation is absent in hydrothermal areas. The presence or absence of snow depends on the heat flow generated at the surface as well as antecedent snow precipitation and temperature conditions. The paper describes the image processing and analysis methodology and examines temperature thresholds and conditions that result in the presence or absence of snow cover.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRemote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XIV
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventRemote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XIV Conference - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 24 2012Sep 26 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume8531
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Conference

ConferenceRemote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XIV Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period9/24/129/26/12

Keywords

  • Airborne remote sensing
  • Hydrothermal systems
  • Thermal infrared remote sensing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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