Time Spent Eating, by Immigrant Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Length of Residence in the United States

Jim P. Stimpson, Brent A. Langellier, Fernando A. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Time spent eating is associated with obesity and diet-related diseases. We examined the association between time adults spent eating, immigrant status, race/ethnicity, and race/ethnicity among adults in the United States. METHODS: We used multivariate linear regression to analyze a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of respondents aged 19 years or older (N = 192,486) from the 2016 American Time Use Survey. The outcome measures were time spent per day on primary eating and drinking and secondary eating. The predictors were immigrant status, race/ethnicity, and years spent living in the United States. RESULTS: Multivariate adjusted minutes per day spent on primary eating and drinking were 66.4 for noncitizens, 66.5 for naturalized citizens, and 60.1 for US-born individuals. Multivariate adjusted minutes per day spent on secondary eating were 11.1 for noncitizens, 12.2 for naturalized citizens, and 12.9 for US-born individuals. Minutes per day spent on primary eating and drinking for immigrants by length of residence in the United States was 69.7 minutes for 5 years or less of residence, 67.9 minutes for 6 to 10 years of residence, 63.6 minutes for 11 to 15 years of residence, and 63.6 minutes for more than 15 years of residence. Minutes per day spent on secondary eating for immigrants by length of residence was 5.5 minutes for 5 years or less of residence, 9.7 minutes for 6 to 10 years of residence, 8.4 minutes for 11 to 15 years of residence, and 12.6 minutes for more than 15 years of residence. CONCLUSION: Time spent eating varied by immigrant status and length of residence in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E150
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 25 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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