Tinkering, tailoring, and bricolage: Implications for theories of Design

Dirk S. Hovorka, Matt Germonprez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current structural specifications for design theory and guidelines for Design Science fall short of creating theories that account for user tinkering, secondary design tailoring, and the interactions of supporting kernel theories. This paper offers an expansion of design theory conceptualization by incorporating aspects of design which occur in everyday technology use. Currently, design theory is focused solely on the artifact while obscuring the teleological information processes for which they are designed. We propose the addition of environments which can organize kernel theories and provide insight regarding interaction and influence of kernel theory in different use contexts. In addition, the modification of information artifacts and processes as users tinker with, and tailor systems is a necessary aspect of design theory specifications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Pages4231-4238
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2009Aug 9 2009

Publication series

Name15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Volume6

Conference

Conference15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period8/6/098/9/09

Keywords

  • Bricolage
  • Design theory
  • Information environments
  • Kernel theory
  • Tailorable technology
  • Tinkering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

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