Transdiagnostic and disease-specific abnormalities in the default-mode network hubs in psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis of resting-state functional imaging studies

Gaelle E. Doucet, Delfina Janiri, Rebecca Howard, Madeline O'Brien, Jessica R. Andrews-Hanna, Sophia Frangou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND.: The default mode network (DMN) dysfunction has emerged as a consistent biological correlate of multiple psychiatric disorders. Specifically, there is evidence of alterations in DMN cohesiveness in schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to synthesize at a fine spatial resolution the intra-network functional connectivity of the DMN in adults diagnosed with schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, capitalizing on powerful meta-analytic tools provided by activation likelihood estimation. METHODS.: Results from 70 whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging articles published during the last 15 years were included comprising observations from 2,789 patients and 3,002 healthy controls. RESULTS.: Specific regional changes in DMN cohesiveness located in the anteromedial and posteromedial cortex emerged as shared and trans-diagnostic brain phenotypes. Disease-specific dysconnectivity was also identified. Unmedicated patients showed more DMN functional alterations, highlighting the importance of interventions targeting the functional integration of the DMN. CONCLUSION.: This study highlights functional alteration in the major hubs of the DMN, suggesting common abnormalities in self-referential mental activity across psychiatric disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e57
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 29 2020

Keywords

  • Default mode network
  • meta-analysis
  • psychiatric disorders
  • resting-state fMRI studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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