Triacylglycerol synthesis during nitrogen stress involves the prokaryotic lipid synthesis pathway and acyl chain remodeling in the microalgae Coccomyxa subellipsoidea

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30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Triglyceride (TAG) synthesis during nitrogen starvation and recovery was addressed using Coccomyxa subellipsoidea by analyzing acyl-chain composition and redistribution using a bioreactor-controlled time course. Galactolipids, phospholipids and TAGs were profiled using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). TAG levels increased linearly through 10. days of N starvation to a final concentration of 12.6% dry weight (DW), while chloroplast membrane lipids decreased from 5% to 1.5% DW. The relative quantities of TAG molecular species, differing in acyl chain length and glycerol backbone position, remained unchanged from 3 to 10. days of N starvation. Six TAG species comprised approximately half the TAG pool. An average of 16.5% of the acyl chains had two or more double bonds consistent with their specific transfer from membrane lipids to TAGs during N starvation. The addition of nitrate following 10. days of N starvation resulted in a dramatic shift from chloroplast-derived to endoplasmic reticulum-derived galactolipids (from < 12% to > 40%). A model for TAG synthesis in C. subellipsoidea was developed based on the acquired data and known plant pathways and data presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-120
Number of pages11
JournalAlgal Research
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Acyl editing
  • Algae
  • Biofuels
  • Coccomyxa subellipsoidea
  • LC-MS/MS
  • Triglyceride synthesis
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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