Unique phenotypes and variation in the sex comb patterns and their evolutionary implications in the Drosophila bipectinata species complex (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

Paras K. Mishra, Bashisth N. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the genetic mechanisms of morphological evolution is one of the greatest challenges in evolutionary biology and for such studies sexually dimorphic traits in closely related species are of prime interest. In the Drosophila bipectinata species complex, which consists of four closely related species, namely D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata, D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae, the pattern of sex combs (a sexually dimorphic trait) is found to be highly diversified. The present investigation documents some unique and new sex comb phenotypes and demarcates intra- and interspecific variations in the sex comb pattern among the four species and their hybrids. There is remarkable similarity in sex comb pattern of D. bipectinata and D. parabipectinata but it differs from that of D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae, which is in consistent with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species traced out by cytological, biochemical and molecular studies. The genetic basis of inheritance of sex comb patterns, its plausible implication with biogeographical distribution of species and the relationship between degree of hybridization and phylogenetic proximity have been addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)805-815
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Entomology
Volume103
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Diptera
  • Drosophila bipectinata species complex
  • Drosophilidae
  • Interspecific hybridization
  • Phylogenetic relationship
  • Sex comb pattern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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