Using aerial photos and field survey methods to monitor fan sedimentation and landscape evolution

Zhenghong Tang, Daniel Brown, Lewis A. Owen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The Mecca Hills at the southern end of the San Andreas strike-slip fault system exemplifies a transpression zone and provides valuable paleoenvironmental data for southernmost California to examine relationship between erosion and landscape development. Clarifying the relationships of the formation of such a transpressional region will help to construct and constrain regional erosion, sediment and landscape models. This study examines the relationships of faulting, fan sedimentation and watershed landscape development in Mecca Hills. The hypothesis of this study is that the extensional faulting related to the San Andreas Fault controls the fan sedimentation in the Northwest of the Mecca Hills. In the northwest region of the Mecca Hills, a succession of landforms, based on the aerial photographic interpretation and field mapping, two upland sections in the Northwest portion of the Mecca Hills were examined in detail to measure the faults, watershed fan sedimentation and watershed landscape evaluation. This study chose nine typical profiles that cross the fans, traces, and the washes to measure the distances and the angles, and then got the three-dimensional profiles maps for the reconstruction of the erosion, sedimentation, and landscape evolution processes. Through field surveying, mapping and aerial photos analysis for the examination of a succession of landforms in the study area, this study found that the San Andreas extensional faulting system directly influenced fan sedimentation as well as the watershed's landscape evolution in the study area. The findings of this study are that the landscape evolution is the result of a complex process in which a series of factors including climate factors, uplifting processes, and erosion processes occurred resulting in the landforms observed today. This paper is a pilot study for reconstructing the processes of erosion, sediment and landscape evolution of a proto-mountain range in the Mecca Hills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationManaging Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference
EditorsG.E. Moglen
Pages677-684
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Williamsburg, VA, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2005Jul 22 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges

Conference

Conference2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges
CountryUnited States
CityWilliamsburg, VA
Period7/19/057/22/05

Keywords

  • Erosion, fan sedimentation
  • Faults
  • Landscape evolution
  • The Mecca Hills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using aerial photos and field survey methods to monitor fan sedimentation and landscape evolution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Tang, Z., Brown, D., & Owen, L. A. (2005). Using aerial photos and field survey methods to monitor fan sedimentation and landscape evolution. In G. E. Moglen (Ed.), Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference (pp. 677-684). (Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges).