Using Photography to Cross Generational, Linguistic, and Cultural Barriers to Develop Useful Survey Instruments

Ian M. Newman, Suree Kanjanawong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Photographs are used as a research tool by anthropologists and as a technique to empower special populations, advocacy groups, and policy makers. This case describes how photography was used to develop a survey to study alcohol expectancies among Thai adolescents. A multi-cultural research team faced generational, linguistic, and cultural barriers in understanding Thai adolescent alcohol use well enough to write useful questions about alcohol expectancies. Asking adolescents to take and then discuss their photographs about alcohol allowed them to express themselves without the imposition of an organizational framework by the investigators. Group discussions of the photographs revealed nuances and subtleties of interpretation of behavior and expectancies involving alcohol that might otherwise have not emerged. The results of this activity were used to refine an expectancy scale used in a large-scale survey of alcohol expectancies and use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-56
Number of pages4
JournalHealth promotion practice
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • alcohol
  • cross-cultural
  • survey development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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