Vaccination with glutamic acid decarboxylase plasmid DNA protects mice from spontaneous autoimmune diabetes and B7/CD28 costimulation circumvents that protection

Balaji Balasa, Bernhard O. Boehm, Anja Fortnagel, Wolfram Karges, Kurt Van Gunst, Nadja Jung, Stephanie A. Camacho, Susan R. Webb, Nora Sarvetnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse develops spontaneous T-cell-dependent autoimmune diabetes. We tested here whether vaccination of NOD mice with a plasmid DNA encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), an initial target islet antigen of autoimmune T cell repertoire, would modulate their diabetes. Our results showed that vaccination of young or old female NOD mice with the GAD-plasmid DNA, but not control-plasmid DNA, effectively prevented their diabetes, demonstrating that GAD-plasmid DNA vaccination is quite effective in abrogating diabetes even after the development of insulitis. The prevention of diabetes did not follow the induction of immunoregulatory Th2 cells but was dependent upon CD28/B7 costimulation. Our results suggest a potential for treating spontaneous autoimmune diabetes via DNA vaccination with plasmids encoding self-Ag.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-252
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • DNA vaccination
  • Diabetes
  • Gene therapy
  • Immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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