Variability in HIV-1 integrase gene and 3’-polypurine tract sequences in cameroon clinical isolates, and implications for integrase inhibitors efficacy

Arpan Acharya, Claude T. Tagny, Dora Mbanya, Julius Y. Fonsah, Emilienne Nchindap, Léopoldine Kenmogne, Ma Jihyun, Alfred K. Njamnshi, Georgette D. Kanmogne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are now included in preferred first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected adults. Studies of Western clade-B HIV-1 show increased resistance to INSTIs following mutations in integrase and nef 3polypurine tract (3’-PPT). With anticipated shifts in Africa (where 25.6-million HIV-infected people resides) to INSTIs-based ART, it is critical to monitor patients in African countries for resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) affecting INSTIs efficacy. We analyzed HIV-1 integrase and 3’-PPT sequences in 345 clinical samples from INSTIs-naïve HIV-infected Cameroonians for polymorphisms and RAMs that affect INSTIs. Phylogeny showed high genetic diversity, with the predominance of HIV-1 CRF02_AG. Major INSTIs RAMs T66A and N155K were found in two (0.6%) samples. Integrase polymorphic and accessory RAMs found included T97A, E157Q, A128T, M50I, S119R, L74M, L74I, S230N, and E138D (0.3%-23.5% of samples). Ten (3.2%) samples had both I72V+L74M, L74M+T97A, or I72V+T97A mutations; thirty-one (9.8%) had 3’-PPT mutations. The low frequency of major INSTIs RAMs shows that INSTIs-based ART can be successfully used in Cameroon. Several samples had ≥1 INSTIs accessory RAMs known to reduce INSTIs efficacy; thus, INSTIs-based ART would require genetic surveillance. The 3’-PPT mutations could also affect INSTIs. For patients failing INSTIs-based ART with no INSTIs RAMs, monitoring 3’-PPT sequences could reveal treatment failure etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1553
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • 3polypurine tract
  • Antiretroviral drugs
  • Cameroon
  • HIV
  • Integrase inhibitors
  • Resistance-associated mutations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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