Venovenous modified ultrafiltration after cardiopulmonary bypass in children: A prospective randomized study (Retraction in: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (2000) 119:3 (630))

H. A. Hennein, U. Kiziltepe, S. Barst, K. A. Bocchieri, A. Hossain, D. R. Call, D. G. Remick, J. P. Gold, J. W. Gaynor, K. Bando, R. A. Jonas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with the production of both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, the balance of which leads to varying degrees of postoperative systemic inflammation. Arteriovenous modified ultrafiltration effectively reduces total body water and improves postoperative hemodynamic and homeostatic functions. Venovenous modified ultrafiltration is a modification of this technique, which has the potentially added advantage of eliminating the obligatory left-to-right shunt associated with arteriovenous modified ultrafiltration. We tested the hypothesis that venovenous modified ultrafiltration is a safe and effective method of achieving ultrafiltration in children after cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods: Thirty-eight pediatric patients were randomly assigned to undergo conventional, venovenous (n = 13), or no ultrafiltration venovenous (n = 13), and controls (n = 12). Perioperative, cardiopulmonary, and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and interleukin-10) data were collected for statistical analysis. Results: Compared with patients in the conventional ultrafiltration and control groups, patients undergoing venovenous modified ultrafiltration had the greatest volume of ultrafiltrate removed (46.9 ± 8.4 mL/kg vs 20.1 ± 5.0 mL/kg and 0 mL/kg for conventional ultrafiltration and control groups, respectively; P = .0001), least increase in total body water (1.91% ± 1.49% vs 3.90% ± 1.86% and 8.24% ± 3.41%; P = .05), greatest rise in hematocrit (39.7% ± 1.7% vs 33.8% ± 2.1% and 29.6% ± 2.3%; P = .006), and shortest length of hospital stay (4.41 + 0.28 days vs 6.69 ± 1.47 days and 8.38 ± 1.11 days; P = .03, P = .03). Conclusions: Venovenous modified ultrafiltration is a safe and effective method of reducing the increase in total body water and duration of postoperative convalescence after cardiopulmonary bypass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-505
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume117
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Hennein, H. A., Kiziltepe, U., Barst, S., Bocchieri, K. A., Hossain, A., Call, D. R., Remick, D. G., Gold, J. P., Gaynor, J. W., Bando, K., & Jonas, R. A. (1999). Venovenous modified ultrafiltration after cardiopulmonary bypass in children: A prospective randomized study (Retraction in: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (2000) 119:3 (630)). Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 117(3), 496-505.