Visual sequential processing and language ability in children who are deaf or hard of hearing

Michelle A. Gremp, Joanne A. Deocampo, Anne M. Walk, Christopher M. Conway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the role of sequential processing in spoken language outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), ages 5;3-11;4, by comparing them to children with typical hearing (TH), ages 6;3-9;7, on sequential learning and memory tasks involving easily nameable and difficult-To-name visual stimuli. Children who are DHH performed more poorly on easily nameable sequencing tasks, which positively predicted receptive vocabulary scores. Results suggest sequential learning and memory may underlie delayed language skills of many children who are DHH. Implications for language development in children who are DHH are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-799
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child Language
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • language development
  • learning cognition
  • memory
  • visual processes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

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