Women who develop ovarian cancer show an increase in serum calcium and a decrease in serum albumin. A longitudinal study in the Janus Serum Bank Cohort

Gary G. Schwartz, Steinar Tretli, Marilyn G. Klug, Trude E. Robsahm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Ovarian cancer is associated with high serum calcium and low serum albumin in clinical and epidemiologic studies. Whether high calcium and low albumin predispose to ovarian cancer or reflect existing cancer is unclear. Objective: Test the hypothesis that serum calcium increases and serum albumin decreases in women who develop ovarian cancer. Methods: Two hundred and four women donated sera to the Janus Serum Bank in Norway pre- and post-diagnosis of ovarian cancer, donations separated by approximately 14 years. We measured calcium and albumin in these sera and calculated the albumin-corrected calcium. Sera were adjusted for patient age and storage time. Results: Post-diagnosis, mean age- and storage-adjusted calcium increased, from 2.53 to 2.68 mmol/L (p < .001). Mean age- and storage-adjusted, albumin-corrected calcium increased from 2.3 to 2.7 mmol/L (p < .001). Conversely, mean age- and storage-adjusted albumin decreased, from a mean of 51.3 to 40.9 g/L (p < .001). Significant changes were observed in women with early stage and metastatic cancer. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that calcium and albumin are serum biomarkers of extant ovarian cancer. Longitudinal changes in calcium and albumin may be useful in ovarian cancer early detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-269
Number of pages6
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume159
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Albumin
  • Biomarkers
  • Calcium
  • Cancer screening
  • Ovarian cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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