Would I have your support? Family network features and past support exchanges associated with anticipated support for a substance problem

Kelly L. Markowski, Jeffrey A. Smith, G. Robin Gauthier, Sela R. Harcey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Assessment of social processes underlying anticipation for recovery-related support from family in the event of a substance problem. We drew from literature on social support, substance use, and social networks to develop a path model connecting emotionally close family relationships, closeness among members in the wider family network (density), previous emotional support exchanges, and anticipated support. Subjects and Methods: We used a sample from the 2019 Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (284 adults; 57% female; 94% white; 46.26% living in rural areas) and employed generalized structural equation modeling with logistic regression equations for our binary dependent variable (anticipated support). Results: Denser family networks were associated with individuals’ close relations with family (b = .18, p < .001), close family relations were associated with support received by (b = .25, p < .05) and given to (b = .47, p < .001) family, and only support given to family increased the odds of anticipated support (IRR = 4.32, CI = 1.13, 16.48). Conclusions: Family-wide dynamics are important for understanding how support exchange relates to anticipated support. Prioritizing efforts to strengthen family relationships and improve the likelihood that at-risk individuals, especially in rural areas, can overcome substance problems is important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Substance Use
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Anticipated support
  • density
  • family
  • social support
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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